Famous Islamic Landmarks

Tomb of Hud

This tomb, in Hadhramaut, Yemen belongs to Hud (a.s.) who was sent as a Prophet to the people of ‘Aad.

The people of ‘Aad were known for their strength and size. The majority however, rejected the invitation of Hud (a.s.) and were destroyed by a powerful wind.

The eleventh Surah of the Quran is named after Prophet Hud (a.s.).

(Information obtained from Islamic Landmarks' website)

More Famous Islamic Landmarks
Tomb of Salahuddin Ayyubi
Noah's Ark
Mosque of Cordoba
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