General Travel News

Italian Museum Burns Artwork in Protest

A museum in Italy is burning artworks from around the world to protest harsh austerity cuts by the Italian government.

Head of the Casoria Contemporary Art Museum in Naples Antonio Manfredi started burning paintings on Tuesday and does not intend to stop destroying art unless the government reverses its decision, the BBC reports.

The first piece of art to be torched was a painting by French artist Severine Bourguignon, who was in favor of the protest and watched it via the internet.

“If a government allows Pompeii to fall then what hope does my museum have,” Manfredi told AFP at the time, following a number of incidents at the world-famous ancient Roman city buried by a volcanic explosion in 79 AD.

The museum has become known for daring exhibitions against the power of the Naples-based Camorra organised crime group and has suffered intimidation.

Last year Manfredi announced he had written a letter to German Chancellor Angela Merkel asking for asylum, saying he was fed up with mafia threats and the government’s failure to protect Italy’s rich cultural heritage. He said he would take his entire museum with him if the asylum was granted but he never received a reply.

More General Travel News
Family summer holiday destinations
3 amazing honeymoon destinations
Dusit Thani Abu Dhabi becomes “Official Hotel Partner” of Abu Dhabi Summer Season 2017
Latest Travel News
Family summer holiday destinations...
Iconic Sheraton Cairo reopens after exte...
Qatar Airways launches direct flights to...
Featured Sights To See
Kilmainham Gaol

Kilmainham Gaol

Dublin, Ireland

Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison turned museum that played an important part in Irish history.  It opened in 1796.  The leadership of failed Irish rebellions in 1798, 1803, 1848, 1867, and 1916 were held, and oftentimes executed here.  Consequently, the prison was seen as an instrument of British colonial control and was closed after independence in 1924.  In the 1950s, plans...

Kasthamandap (Pavilion of the Wood)

Kasthamandap (Pavilion of the Wood)

Kathmandu, Nepal

A three-roof building that according to local lore was constructed in the 12th century from the wood of a single sal tree. It was first used as a community centre for the congregation of the people before major events. It was later converted into a temple dedicated to Gorakhnath a 13th century abstinent who was linked to the royal family. Currently the building houses an image of a god which is in...

London Eye

London Eye

London, United Kingdom

From its completion in 2000 until 2006, the London Eye was the world’s tallest Ferris wheel. One of several iconic projects built to celebrate the year 2000 (along with the Millennium Dome and the Millenium Bridge), it has become a symbol of London in the twenty-first century. The eye features 32 capsules, each representing one of London’s boroughs and capable of holding up to 25 people. Owing t...

Le Corbusier Center

Le Corbusier Center

Zurich, Switzerland

 The Le Corbusier Center, home to the Heidi Weber Museum, was the final building designed by Le Corbusier, one of the seminal architects of the twentieth century.  He was born Charles-Edouart Jeanneret in a small city in eastern Switzerland in 1887.  He would shape the Modernist movement in architecture with his International Style, and his influence can be seen in cities throughout...